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Meet Stephanie Sokolove

Preface: This interview took place last year. She is graciously hosting this year’s Table of Life Event at her Estate. What a wonderful partner she has been to the Foodbank!

Onto the Interview: September 2014

The-BEET Stephanie Sokolove

Many of you have heard of the Table of Life Fundraiser that supports the Foodbank’s Feed the Future programs, a sequential series of programs created by the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County that fosters nutritional health and independence in children of all ages. This year, on October 5th, the Foodbank is thrilled and proud to have Stephanie Sokolove as Table of Life’s keynote speaker. Stephanie is Owner and Executive Chef to THREE nationally recognized restaurants in the Boston area, Stephanie’s on Newbury, Stephi’s on Tremont, and Stephi’s in Southie.

Stephanie has built her business on a style of cooking that she calls “Sophisticated Comfort,” a style that is fresh, interesting, and yet familiar. “Sophisticated Comfort Food” is the next generation of comfort food in that it blends traditional favorites with today’s food preferences. Dishes are imaginatively created with current, fresher ingredients and bolder flavors then artistically presented. At the restaurant, Stephanie spins familiar classics into elegant dishes that comfort and surprise without being fussy or intimidating.

http://www.stephaniesonnewbury.com/stephanie-sokolove-bio.pdf

I sat down with the gracious Stephanie Sokolove to ask her some questions about her health and food philosophies, and of course I couldn’t help but ask a little about her restaurants.

The BEET Question 1To me healthy is waking up and feeling good; feeling energetic, clear headed and ready to face the day.

The BEET Question 2

It’s important to be able to function at your top level.  If were not healthy it’s hard to get through the day.  For example, I play golf.  To feel and play my best, I don’t eat big meals beforehand, as I need to feel light to play well.

The BEET Question 3

It’s got to play into it. But I believe survival probably comes first before health. If people knew where healthy choices were offered, I think they would make the right choice. But people don’t always know where to get healthy foods.   If we can get this message out to the community, I think that would be amazingly welcomed. What kills me is to see overweight kids, eating unhealthy foods, they can’t feel well!

The BEET Question 4

Personal health choices and restaurant services can be conflicting, as, what makes food delicious is not necessarily what you should eat every day.  However in my restaurants, everything is fresh, nothing comes out of a can; fresh is best.  That is a requirement to make food delicious.  Sugar, butter, and salt tend to make food taste better but we have cut back on these things for our health.   So we also offer dishes with less butter, less cream, and use fresh sauces instead of cream sauces for fish. California food has seen an evolution over the last 20 years.  It was known for its heavy comfort foods, but now we are seeing lighter comfort foods and fresher options like all kinds of amazing salads.

The BEET Question 6 I believe the Avocado is the healthiest single food we could eat.  And it is so versatile!  Substitute for oil and butter.  It’s a Fruit/ vegetable that is worth experimenting with;  Salads, sauces, baking.  Salads don’t need oil, ripe avocado gives salad a lovely creamy texture.

The BEET Question 8 Working in a restaurant where food is abundant, you become unaware of how much food is needed.  Working with the Foodbank has been an eye-opener to me.

 

 

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What is Plant Based Eating? And Why Should I Care?

The environment and its health is a hot topic right now.  Similarly, OUR health is a hot topic right now.  Many of us have seen the warnings…

Global Impact Infographic

Ecological Footprints Tim De Chant, Per Square Mile

1. If the whole world lived like we do in the United States, we would need 4.1 earths.1

2. More than one-third (34.9% or 78.6 million) of U.S. adults are obese.2

3. This generation of children may be the first in U.S. history to live sicker and die younger than their parents.Heart Disease and Diabetes

4. 1 in 4 Americans will die from heart disease.4

5. 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, have diabetes.5

According to journalist and blogger Tim De Chant, the USA makes up 5% of the global population, but we use 20% of the world’s energy. We eat 15% of the world’s meat (that’s 10 BILLION Animals Every Year), and we produce 40% of the world’s garbage, which includes 16 BILLION disposable diapers every year.  In addition, each American throws away 1200 pounds of organic garbage every year that can be composted. We consume an awful lot of STUFF and hardly take a minute to think about its effects.

I want to zero in on those 10 Billion animals we kill and eat every year.  What are the implications for our environment and our health?  Many researchers will argue that it is this animal consumption that is responsible for our obesity, our lower life expectancy, our sick hearts, our out-of-control blood sugar, and our very sick planet.

And OH BOY there are a lot of implications! Over the next several posts, we will dive into all the dangers our planet and we face if we don’t change our attitudes about and consumption of animals. Let’s start with:

Our Health

As stated, many will agree that the overconsumption of animals is directly related to the health crisis Americans find themselves in today.  (Sugar plays a big role in this too.)  According to renowned Food Writer, Author and New York Times Columnist Mark Bittman who follows a “Vegan Before 6pm” lifestyle:

  • Americans are consuming close to 200 pounds of meat, fish, and poultry per year, an increase in 50 pounds in the last 50 years.6
  • Each average animal eater takes in about 110 grams of protein every day, which is double the recommended daily allowance. About 75 grams of these come from animal foods.6
  • According to the Institute of Medicine we only need approximately 10 to 15 percent of our calories to come from protein. The average woman needs about 46 grams per day and the average man, 56 grams per day.7
  • Many current nutrition experts would argue that 55 grams of protein (half of the average 110 grams) a day is more than we need, and roughly 30 grams, strictly from plant sources, is perfectly adequate.6

These staggering numbers showcase how overindulgent we are with protein. High protein, low carbohydrate diets are all the rage; Paleo, Atkins, even the new Whole 30. They are encouraging us to consume an alarming amount of animal protein that is directly contributing to our epidemic rates of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

Dr_-Richard-O-Dr. Richard Oppenlander, a sustainability consultant, researcher, and author who has spent 40 years studying the effects food choices have on our planet and on us wrote about the HUGE cost animal consumption is to our health and healthcare system in his new book “Food Choice and SustainabilityWhy Buying Local, Eating Less Meat, and Taking Baby Steps Won’t Work.The BEET FOod CHoice and SustainabilityRecently featured on Julianne Heaver, Plant Based Dietitian’s blog, a nationally recognized advocate and expert on plant based nutrition, she provided a quote from his new groundbreaking book: I quote:8

“In the U.S. and other developed countries, eating animals is one of the most significant risk factors found in nearly all of the most common diseases. It is, therefore, heavily implicated in rising health care costs, health insurance premiums, foods prices, and even labor costs for businesses. Those who eat animals are driving up all these costs while driving down productivity.

More than $3 trillion dollars were spent on health care in 2012 ($2.83 trillion in 2009, growing at 6 percent per year) in the U.S. Of that, minimally $130 billion dollars spent were due to dietary choices related to livestock. I believe this figure is quite conservative and could be as high as $350 billion due to eating animals, because this is how some of the $3 trillion was spent:

  • $300 billion—heart disease
  • $200 billion—diabetes
  • $190 billion—obesity
  • $124 billion—cancer
  • $88 billion—food-borne illness

These figures are truly staggering and are for just one single year. They also do not reflect loss of productivity. For obesity alone, it is estimated that the annual cost of the workdays missed is $30 billion, with employers losing, on average, $3,800 per year for a single obese person. These are not just figures or statistics to me; they’re patterns that tell a story about what we choose to eat as a society and what happens to us afterwards—the stark and very real consequences. Eating animal products increases risks of contracting diseases that contribute to all of these health care costs. Eating plants, on the other hand, will take you in the other direction, protecting you from developing these diseases.”

According to Dr. Oppenlander, it is estimated that eating purely plant-based foods provides the following protective benefits, as compared to individuals eating the average amount of meat:

  • 50 percent less risk of coronary heart disease (CHD)
  • 40 percent less risk of cancer (breast, colon, prostate, ovarian, 
pancreatic, lung)
  • 70 percent less likelihood of adult onset diabetes
  • 50 percent less likelihood of developing hypertension

Most people are unaware any foods other than animal foods have protein! Seriously! This cartoon below is actually a pretty accurate portrayal of most Americans.

photo

This is far from true! As a plant based eater myself, I can’t tell you how many people have asked me in a panic “BUT WHERE DO YOU GET YOUR PROTEIN?” Here’s the meme I want to show them:

mostinterestingman

You CAN find plenty of protein in plants! And Veggie protein has so many more positive benefits! Here are just some of the plant-based protein superstars and the amount of protein they contain per cup: (featured on Plantbaseddietitian.com)9

vegan

For now, on this complex and complicated topic, I leave you to think about your health, what you eat, and how much you spend annually on healthcare costs. Do you think you have room for improvement? Does this post make you think twice about having your typical eggs and bacon breakfast? How about a deliciously deceiving Tofu Breakfast Scramble with a side of sweet Good Morning Quinoa Breakfast Cereal!   Both are protein packed, will send you off to work/school/or wherever with the sustained energy to make a difference and advocate for a more kind and healthy food culture! YEA!!The BEET-I am Not a Hamburger

Stay tuned in the next few months for how consuming animal foods is extremely detrimental to our planet and to the welfare of animals. And trust me, there is light at the end of the tunnel. People are doing amazing things to turn the health of our planet around. In addition, many leading experts in plant based nutrition are fervently spreading the word about the harmful effects of too much animal protein, so hopefully we as a nation can turn our health around too!

References:

  1. PopSci
  2. CDC
  3. State of Obesity
  4. CDC
  5. Diabetes.org
  6. Mark Bittman, New York Times
  7. IOM
  8. Julianne Heaver
  9. Julianne Heaver 

Oct 8, 2016 – Table of Life Gala

delicious food
BUY TICKETS NOW! Tickets are $300.
GARDEN PARTY ATTIRE: SEMI-FORMAL, HATS AND FLATS. VALET PARKING PROVIDED AT ESTATE ENTRANCE.

Date: October 8, 2016
Time: 4 pm – 7 pm
Host/Location: Jim & Stephanie Sokolove’s Montecito Estate
1569 East Valley Road, Montecito CA 93108
www.tableoflife.org

TOL_Logo_Green_2016

Honoring: Deckers Brands and Maryan Schall
Co-Chairs: Ann Daniel and Nancy Sheldon
Band & Entertainment: Doublewide Kings and Fred Kass,  MD, Cancer Center of Santa Barbara
Featured Chefs: Michael Hutchings & Christine Dahl

Host Committee:
MICHELLE APODACA, MARYBETH CARTY, ANN DANIEL, REBECCA GOEBEL, EVA HALLER,
PALMER JACKSON JR., JILL LEVINSON, DC MCGUIRE, SARAH MUZZY, CATHERINE PICKETT, NANCY SHELDON, STEPHANIE SOKOLOVE, NINA TERZIAN AND DIANE ZIPPERSTEIN

Honorary Committee: STEPHEN AIZENSTAT • MICHELLE APODACA • MIKE AND TRACY BOLLAG • MARYBETH CARTY • ANN DANIEL • PHYLLIS DE PICCIOTTO • DANYEL DEAN • ROBERT AND CHRISTINE EMMONS • ALAN GHITTERMAN •  PERRY GIBSON AND KENNETH KRAUS • REBECCA GOEBEL • CARLA HAHN • EVA HALLER • MAREN HASEN • PERRI HARCOURT • RICHARD AND KAREN HEIMBERG • PALMER AND SUSAN JACKSON • MORRIE AND IRMA JURKOWITZ • BARRY AND JILL KITNICK • NEIL AND JILL LEVINSON • SARA MILLER MCCUNE • ARCHIE MCLAREN •  ARLENE MONTESANO • BILL AND SANDI NICHOLSON • NATALIE ORFALEA • TOM PARKER •   ERIC AND NINA PHILLIPS • LADY LESLIE RIDLEY-TREE • STAN RODEN • SUSAN ROSE • ALISON WRIGLEY RUSACK AND GEOFF RUSACK • KEN AND JO SAXON • MARYAN SCHALL • MIKE AND NANCY SHELDON • CHUCK AND MISSY SHELDON • STEPHEN SINGLETON AND CHRISTOPHER TEASLEY • STEPHANIE AND JIM SOKOLOVE • TOM AND HEATHER STURGESS • NINA TERZIAN • MIKE AND ANNE TOWBES • JIM AND SHERRY VILLANUEVA • DIANE AND STEVEN ZIPPERSTEIN

Silver
DECKERS BRAND
NEIL AND JILL LEVINSON AND MORRIE AND IRMA JURKOWITZ
MARYAN SCHALL
MISSY AND CHUCK SHELDON AND NANCY AND MIKE SHELDON
STEPHANIE AND JIM SOKOLOVE

Bronze
ANN JACKSON FAMILY FOUNDATION
MIKE AND TRACY BOLLAG
MARCY CARSEY
COTTAGE HEALTH
BOB AND CHRISTINE EMMONS
SAGE PUBLICATIONS
WARREN AND MARY LYNN STALEY
HEATHER AND TOM STURGESS
VENOCO, INC.

Patron
DAN AND MEG BURNHAM
ANN DANIEL
PERRY GIBSON
SHELLEY AND RICK FOGG
VICKI AND BOB HAZARD
MAIA KIKERPILL AND DANIEL NASH
GERD AND PETE JORDANO
CHEF MICHAEL HUTCHINGS AND CHRISTINE DAHL
DOROTHY LARGAY
CARL E. LINDROS
MONTECITO BANK & TRUST
MISSION WEALTH
STEPHEN AND CAROL OLSON
PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS TIMES
H. SMITH RICHARDSON III
SANTA BARBARA CITY COLLEGE FOUNDATION
KEN AND JO SAXON
JEAN SCHUYLER
SIGNATURE PARKING
BARRY SPECTOR
THE TENT MERCHANT
WELLS FARGO
DAVID AND KAYE WILLETTE
VILLAGE PROPERTIES

 

Fifth Annual Table of Life Gala
a garden party benefiting the Foodbank

Bringing together the local food industry, chefs, restaurateurs, wine makers and foodies to celebrate Santa Barbara County’s finest. This year, the Foodbank is proud to honor, Maryan Schall and Deckers Brand for their leadership and steadfast commitment to improving food security. The Table of Life Gala will be held at Jim and Stephanie Sokolove’s beautiful Montecito Estate on Saturday, October 8, 2016. Proceeds will support the nutritional health of our community through building and inspiring our next generation of culinary talent. Learn more about Feed the Future programs. Event is limited to 200 guests.

2016 Sponsorship Levels 
Fruit of the Earth Champion $30,000 – includes 10 person table
Garden of the Earth $20,000 – includes 10 person table
School of Knowledge $10,000 – includes 10 person table
Feed the Future Supporter $5,000 – includes 5 person table
Patron Ticket $1000 – includes 2 gala tickets

For sponsorship, please contact: Jane Lindsey, (805) 967-5741 X 101
BUY TICKETS NOW! Tickets are $300.

New Nutrition News and Tips to Resume in November

Hello Readers!

Here’s what’s going in in October at the Foodbank, and boy it’s a busy month!

  • Launching programs across the county (Food Literacy in Preschools, Kids Farmers Market, Teems Love Cooking, Diabetes Impact Group)
  • Preparing for our Foodbank Partners Summit at La Casa De Maria in Montecito Oct 21st
  • Preparing for our Impact Departments trip to Chicago for Feeding America’s big yearly conference ACPN

I appreciate your patience as we diligently work in the Impact Department to ensure our programs are successfully up and running and we are prepared for our big Summit and Conference.

New The BEET: All Things Nutrition Posts will resume in November with topics covering Fat, Sustainability, Artificial Sweeteners, and Gut Microbes as well as more Guest Interviews with prominent Santa Barbara Voices. Also stay tuned for some delicious Fall recipes that are bound to satisfy all your senses.

You can now subscribe to The BEET by entering in your email on the left side of the blog and by clicking on the “SUBSCRIBE” button. By subscribing, you will receive an email notification when a new post has been added. This will be much easier than remembering to check out my page every week!

Healthy Halloween

Happy Halloween, and remember to treat your bodies well over the usually sugar laden holiday. Fill up on wonderful and sweet Fall fruits and vegetables like figs, apples, squash and sweet potatoes. Your body and soul will thank you.

The BEET: Heirloom Tomato, Peach, and Basil Summer Salad

Tomato, Basil and Peach Salad

At the Foodbank, we pride ourselves in teaching others the importance of and value in preparing seasonal recipes that nourish our body. And late Summer time is all about sweet and juicy tomatoes and peaches. The sweetness of the peach perfectly balances the acidity of the tomato, and lucky for us, they are both in season together. The colors alone will make your mouth water.

Tomatoes are an antioxidant powerhouse, their most famous antioxidant being lycopene. Tomatoes are an excellent source of Vitamin C and beta-carotene, and a good source of potassium, vitamin K, and manganese. Due to these powerful nutrients, tomatoes do a great job of protecting us from oxidative damage, reducing our risk for heart disease and certain cancers. Some studies also suggest that tomatoes help protect our bloodstream as well as our bone and kidney health.

With the peach’s beautiful coral and golden orange colors, you can be sure you are eating a great source of Vitamin A. Vitamin A is famous for promoting healthy vision, especially in low light. Vitamin A also helps form and maintain healthy skin, teeth, and skeletal and soft tissues. It’s a dynamite nutrient.

Please indulge in this delicious and colorful salad as you embrace the last few weeks of Summer. Your body will thank you!

Heirloom Tomato, Peach, and Basil Summer Salad

Prep Time: 5 Minutes Yield: 4-6 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 heirloom tomatoes (any color), cored and thinly slicedTomatoes and Peaches
  • 2 ripe peaches, cored and thinly sliced
  • ¼ of a red onion, thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup torn or julienned fresh basil
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar
  • Sprinkle of salt and pepper to taste

Method

Combine the tomatoes, peaches and red onion in a bowl and toss with the basil, olive oil, vinegar, salt and pepper until evenly mixed. Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate up to two days. Enjoy in the sunshine with family if possible!

Substitute:

  • Nectarines for peaches if you prefer smooth to fuzzy skin
  • Apple cider vinegar for Balsamic vinegar for a milder taste

Add:

  • A sprinkle of creamy feta or goat cheese for cheese lovers
  • Pistachios or walnuts for a sweet crunch

The BEET: Meet Rhianna King, RD

Rhianna King, RDRhianna King is a clinical registered dietitian at Marian Regional Medical Center in Santa Maria, and works with cancer patients at the Mission Hope Cancer Center to provide appropriate nutritional counseling, information and recommendations. She currently serves as the Clinical Nutrition Manager at Marian. She graduated from California Polytechnic State University in 2009 with a Bachelors of Sciences in Nutrition. She completed her Dietetic Internship through Cal Poly as well. She encourages patients and clients to focus on eating mostly plants to optimize their health and prevent/fight disease. She embodies what it means to be a connected and caring nutrition professional and registered dietitian, whose focus is to provide evidence based nutrition information throughout Santa Maria.

The BEET Q1“To me being healthy means feeling your best both physically and mentally to enjoy life to its fullest. This includes engaging in activities like healthy eating and regular physical activity that keeps your body functioning as it should.”

The BEET Q2“Our health directly impacts our quality of life. Living healthy means a longer life, less time spent in the hospital, and less time spending money on medications and procedures that have the potential to be prevented through proper nutrition and physical activity. Food fuels our body and has everything we need in it for optimal health. If you look at the composition of a tomato for example versus a human being you might be surprised at all the similarities; water, carbohydrate, protein, vitamins, minerals, etc. Our body is capable of so many amazing things and proper nutrition is the required fuel.”

The BEET Q3“My motivation comes from my desire to have a positive impact in the lives of the people around me. I have knowledge in a particular field that can improve health, prevent and treat disease, and that knowledge needs to be shared. I want to help people take charge of their health and improve their lives.”

The BEET Q4“I think food insecurity can have a negative impact on both physical and mental health. Inadequate nutrition can also cause social anxieties and behavioral changes all leading to poor quality of life.”

The-BEET-GI-Question-5“Food First! I try to instill in everyone that consuming a variety of foods is the best way to achieve optimal nutrition, NOT through a pill. There is no “magic” single food or dietary supplement that creates the perfect diet. The FUNdamentals with Food class I started at the cancer center serves to be educational about healthy diet practices by exposing our patients to the variety of healthy foods we talk about through cooking demonstration and lecture. I always comment that healthy food doesn’t have to be boring or taste bad and its part of my job as nutrition professional and advocate to prove that to you.”

The BEET Q6“Enjoy a diet that is 2/3 plant based and experience great health for yourself!”

For more information about the FUNdamentals of Food Class and other health and wellness classes run through the Mission Hope Cancer Center, please click here.

And check out Rhianna King’s Article The Red, White, and Blue of Summer Produce that shares the Nutrition Power of summer fruits and vegetables.

The BEET: The Power of Fruits and Vegetables

 

Fruit and Veggies

Fruits and Vegetables in the News

We’ve all seen the news that eating fruits and vegetables helps us in all aspects of our lives. It seems like every day, studies emerge linking fruit and vegetable consumption to overall health and vitality like below:

Nutriton Headlines

 

 

Fruits and Vegetables are linked to reducing your risk of obesity, heart disease, and certain cancers. They are even linked to improving your optimism and reducing your risk of death! Is there truth to these claims? YES! While some of the statements are exaggerative, the truth is, fruits and vegetables help us in all these areas because they are nutrient dense and low calorie foods that the body needs and craves for optimal health.

Nutrient Dense Foods

When you eat nutrient dense and low calorie foods, like fruits and vegetables, you are maximizing the amount of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants you eat, while keeping your calorie intake low.

Nutrition Power

Vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants help our bodies function properly and achieve optimal wellness. Vitamins and minerals in fruits and vegetables positively affect our metabolism, protein synthesis, brain function…the list goes on and on.

Auntie OxidantAntioxidants act as scavengers in our bodies, traveling through our tissues and cells, to locate the damaging free radicals that seek to harm our cells. These free radicals damage our body’s protein and fat cells, as well as our cellular DNA, increasing our risk for certain cancers and heart disease. Free radicals are unavoidable, as they are formed when we breathe in pollution or smoke, when we are stressed, or when we eat less healthy foods. We need these powerful antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables to confront these war-like free radicals and say “No, not in my body!”

Now think about what this means in terms of weight management and optimism. By eating more nutrient dense and low calorie foods, you are optimizing your health and supplying your body with what it truly needs. You can and should feel proud of yourself for treating yourself in the best possible way. I don’t know about you, but when I eat a fruit or a vegetable, I imagine my body thanking me for nourishing it. I feel healthier immediately, energized, and ready to take on the day. I feel confident that what I have just put in my body will sustain and take care of me. I feel more connected to the earth and what it provides for me, therefore, I have a more optimistic outlook on the day.

Give Peas a Chance

(I am fully aware of how hippie-like this sounds, but it’s true!!)

Good Nutrition Equals Mental Health

By feeling healthier and more connected, you can tackle depressive moments and pessimistic views. Many studies have linked depression to being overweight or obese. By incorporating more fruits and vegetables into your meals, you are foregoing more calorie “rich” foods laden with starchy carbohydrates and saturated fat which have been shown to increase your risk for obesity as well as weigh you down physically and emotionally.

Vicious Circle

In this vicious circle, overeating unhealthy foods can lead to depression, and depression can lead to overeating unhealthy foods. It’s not science.

Optimistic Circle

 Putting This Into Action

So how do we do this? Fruits and vegetables have a stigma, one that desperately needs to be eradicated. As a dietitian, I hear all the time, “fruits and vegetables are expensive…they are hard to prepare…I don’t know how to use them…I know I should eat them, but…”

I don’t want to try and convince you that fruits and vegetables are cheaper than fast food, but if thoughtfully planned out, they can be a very affordable part of your diet, especially if you utilize the produce the Foodbank offers, or if you grow your own. Fruits and vegetables also are less expensive if you buy them in season, because you don’t have to pay for the cost of transportation as well as other hidden costs.

Fresh Salad PrepAnd they are not hard to prepare! As long as you have a knife and a cutting board, the time it takes to cut up a lettuce, carrot, cucumber, broccoli, and avocado salad is less than 5 minutes! That’s less time than it takes to go through a drive-through window. And at the same time, you are breaking this “vicious circle” of poor diet and unhappiness.

I am confident, if you continue to tune into The BEET: All Things Nutrition, you will change the way you think about fruits and vegetables. They will become staples in your kitchens, the center of your family dining experience, and important components of your everyday health.

Stay tuned for more of The BEET: All Things Nutrition. And make sure to sign up for the Foodbank’s e-mail newsletter to discover great new resources for our entire community.

 

 

Foodbank of Santa Barbara County Seeks Community Votes in ‘Your Favorite Charity’ Contest

NoozhawkLogo

 

NewsReleases_NoozhawkLogo

http://www.noozhawk.com/article/foodbank_of_santa_barbara_county_finalist_your_favorite_charity_contest

By Amy Bernstein for the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County | Published on 07.25.2014 3:45 p.m.

Help the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County continue to end hunger and transform the health of Santa Barbara County by voting in KSBY and PG&E’s “Your Favorite Charity” contest!

The charity that gathers the most votes overall will walk away with $10,000, and the charity that gathers the most votes per category will receive $2,000 each.

In Santa Barbara County, one in four people receive food support from the Foodbank; over 104,500 unduplicated people of whom 44 percent are children. Some of the nourishment programs that help solve hunger are the Brown Bag Program and Picnic in the Park. The Brown Bag Program provides a grocery bag of nutritious staple foods including high-protein items, canned soups, pasta, cereal, eggs, bread and seasonal fresh fruits and vegetables to low income seniors, and Picnic in the Park provides free nutritious meals to children over the summer.

In addition to its nourishment programs, the Foodbank also provides nutrition education to foster nutritional independence and health in children. One of these programs is Kid’s Farmers Market. Each month the Kid’s Farmers Market Program provides fresh produce and nutrition education to children from low-income families at 27 after-school programs countywide. The nutrition education teaches children healthy recipes, how fruits and vegetables are grown, how they are cooked and their nutritional value and importance.

Last year, the Foodbank distributed the food and resources to support 8.5 million meals — half of which was fresh produce. Vote now to help continue providing the award-winning programs to residents throughout Santa Barbara County. And keep voting once a day until Friday, Aug. 1. You can vote for one charity per day per IP address. Click here to vote.

The winner will be announced Aug. 7.

Click here to learn more about Foodbank and its programs.

— Amy Bernstein is a publicist representing the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County.

 

Foodbank of Santa Barbara County Seeks Community’s Vote for $10,000 Prize

nprn

http://nprnsb.org/foodbank-of-santa-barbara-county-seeks-communitys-vote-for-10000-prize/

Help Foodbank of Santa Barbara County continue to end hunger and transform the health of Santa Barbara County by voting in KSBY and PG&E’s “Your Favorite Charity” contest! The charity that gathers the most votes overall will walk away with $10,000 and the charity that gathers the most votes per category will receive $2,000 each.

In Santa Barbara County, one in four people receive food support from the Foodbank; over 104,500 unduplicated people of whom 44% are children. Some of the nourishment programs that help solve hunger are the Brown Bag Program and Picnic in the Park. The Brown Bag Program provides a grocery bag of nutritious staple foods including high-protein items, canned soups, pasta, cereal, eggs, bread and seasonal fresh fruits and vegetables to low income seniors, and Picnic in the Park provides free nutritious meals to children over the summer.

In addition to its nourishment programs, Foodbank also provides nutrition education to foster nutritional independence and health in children. One of these programs is Kid’s Farmers Market.

Each month the Kid’s Farmers Market Program provides fresh produce and nutrition education to children from low-income families at 27 afterschool programs countywide. The nutrition education teaches children healthy recipes, how fruits and vegetables are grown, how they are cooked and their nutritional value and importance.

Last year, the Foodbank distributed the food and resources to support 8.5 million meals – half of which was fresh produce. Vote now to help continue providing the award winning programs to residents throughout Santa Barbara County. And keep voting once a day until Friday, August 1, 2014. You can vote for one charity per day per IP address. To vote, visithttp://ksby.upickem.net/engine/Welcome.aspx?contestid=136046.

The winner will be announced on August 7th.

To learn more about Foodbank and their programs, visit http://www.foodbanksbc.org/

July 21 – Aug 1 Help us win $10,000. Vote once a day!

Are we your favorite cause?366We’re finalists in the KSBY and PG&E “Your Favorite Charity” contest! We could win $10,000 to move our community from hunger to health.

Will you vote for us? Please vote here.

367

Please vote every day now through August 1st and ask friends to vote, too. Use @FoodbankSB #KSBY and #PGE4ME on social media.

KSBY will announce the winner on August 7.  More details here.

Only YOU can decide: are we “Your Favorite Charity?”

You must be a resident of Santa Barbara County or San Luis Obispo County to participate in the voting contest. Only 1 vote per day per IP address (see contest rules).