Category: Health

Vegetable Spaghetti Pasta

The Vegetable Spaghetti from our Healthy School Pantry program is a must try if you’re looking for a DELICIOUS dinner idea! See the full recipe below…

 

Ingredients

1- lbs Spaghetti pasta

1/4 cup green onions, chopped

1 cup diced carrots, peeled

1 pack veggie slaw

1/2 cup corn, fresh or can

1 cup diced onion, small

1 cup celery diced, small

1 lbs Broccoli, cut into small florets

2 tbs oil

Salt & pepper

Optional (fresh garlic , dried basil or oregano )

 

Cooking Directions

1) Heat sautéed pan with oil over medium heat

2) Add prepped onions, carrots and celery in to pan mix evenly cook for 2 mins

3) Add prepped broccoli and veggie slaw cook for 1 or 2 minutes

4) Add cooked spaghetti pasta stir well for 1 minute

5) Then add spaghetti sauce or tomato sauce and cook 2 minutes

6) Season with Salt and pepper for taste

 

Cooking pasta directions

1) Bring 4 qts water to rapid boil

2) Add pasta and stir

3) Stir frequently, uncovered, for 10-12 minutes

4) Drain and run cold water over until cooled

Serving for 6

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Tonja’s Story

tonja_lea-1

When I moved from my home country the Netherlands to Santa Barbara last year, I was 7 months pregnant with our first baby. Exploring my new homestead with a big belly, I first heard about the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County at a sustainable foods fair at the UCSB. Two passionate Foodbank volunteers told me about millions of pounds of healthy foods sourced by the Foodbank each year for their 300 non-profit partners, as well as the Foodbank’s in-house programs that empower people who face food insecurity with free nutrition education and improved access to healthy foods for program recipients and their families.

I believe it as an advantage that the United States has had a far longer tradition of food banks than my country of origin. While food banks in the Netherlands focus majorly on giving out foods to low-income people, the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County builds on an ever increasing amount of knowledge about nutrition and has created best practices to share this with the community such as teaching people about healthy and affordable foods, empowering community leaders to build stronger local networks and establishing innovative partnerships with health organizations in the community; these activities unknown to most of the food banks in the Netherlands.

I immediately felt passionate about working for the Foodbank and I finally got the chance about 8 months ago and ever since have been very happy to use all of my previous working expertise and efforts to roll out Foodbank’s new nutrition education program for people living with diabetes that also deal with food insecurity. I am grateful for the partnerships we’ve established with health organizations in both Santa Maria and Santa Barbara that increase our impact and compliment our individual strengths.

My daughter, Lea, is now 15 months old and being a mother makes me even more aware of the importance of improved access to healthy foods for everyone. Being able to provide my child with nutritious foods is a blessing and unfortunately not a straightforward thing for every parent, while it should be. Everyone at the Foodbank works hard to see this changed and it is only through generous donations and strong partnerships in the community that we can continue our work.

Tonja van Gorp is the Community Programs Coordinator at the Foodbank.

 

Persimmon Bread

Persimmons are delicious, exotic fruits that do more than serve as a sweet and tasty treat; they have a wealth of vitamin and minerals packed inside them, including vitamins A C, E and B6, as well as dietary fiber, manganese, copper, magnesium, potassium and phosphorous.
INGREDIENTS
SERVINGS 10 – 2 loaves
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1 1/2cups sugar
2 eggs, beaten
1cup persimmon pulp
1 3⁄4 cups flour
1⁄2 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1⁄2 teaspoon nutmeg
1⁄2 teaspoon clove
1⁄2 teaspoon allspice
1⁄2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1⁄2 cup chopped walnuts
1⁄2cup chopped dates (optional)

DIRECTIONS
1. Preheat oven 350 degrees.
2. In a large bowl blend sugar and oil; add eggs and persimmon pulp.
3. In a separate bowl, sift together flour, baking powder, baking soda and spices; add nuts and dates then mix well.
4. Stir flour mixture into persimmon mixture. Turn into two greased and floured loaf pans. Bake for one hour or until done, testing center with a pick.
5. Turn out on wire rack to cool.

Raspberry Buckwheat Pancakes

Antioxidant-packed raspberries paired with buckwheat flour make a terrific-tasting, health-promoting breakfast. Raspberries are in season from July to October; pick up a box of freshly picked raspberries from the local farmers market and use this recipe for your brunch inspiration.

Ingredients:

1/2 cup buckwheat flour
1/2 cup cornmeal
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 ripe banana, mashed
2 tablespoons maple syrup
1 tablespoon vinegar
1 cup fortified soy or rice milk
1 cup fresh or frozen raspberries
Vegetable oil spray

Directions:

Mix buckwheat flour, cornmeal, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.

In a separate large bowl, combine mashed banana, maple syrup, vinegar, and non-dairy milk. Add flour mixture, stirring just enough to remove any lumps and make a pourable batter. Stir in raspberries and add a bit more milk if the batter seems too thick.

Preheat a non-stick skillet or griddle, then spray lightly with vegetable oil. Pour small amounts of batter onto the heated surface and cook until tops bubble. Turn carefully with a spatula and cook the second sides until browned, about 1 minute. Serve immediately.

Per serving (1 pancake): 55 calories; 0.5 g fat; 0.1 g saturated fat; 8.1% calories from fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 1.5 g protein; 11.8 g carbohydrates; 3.8 g sugar; 1.1 g fiber; 81 mg sodium; 32 mg calcium; 0.6 mg iron; 1.6 mg vitamin C; 9 mcg beta carotene; 0.3 mg vitamin E

Makes 16 3-inch pancakes

Family Friendly Recipes: Scrambled Eggs with Artichokes

 

scrambled-eggs-ArtichokeRecipe_FoodbankRecipesScrambled eggs are easy to prepare and adding artichokes keeps the eggs moist and fluffy. A quick, healthy breakfast the entire family can enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp. butter
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
  • 2–3 hearts of medium artichokes, steamed and sliced
  • 4 eggs
  • 1⁄4 cup reduced fat milk
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

  1. Heat 1 tbsp. of the butter in a skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and cook until fragrant, 1–2 minutes. Remove garlic and add artichokes. Cook, stirring, for 2 minutes, then transfer to a bowl and keep warm.
  2. Wipe out skillet, then add remaining 2 tbsp. butter and melt over medium heat. Beat eggs with milk and 1 tbsp. water. Add eggs to skillet, season with salt and pepper, and cook, folding gently with a spatula, until eggs are set and fluffy,about 2 minutes.
  3. Fold in artichokes, then spoon immediately onto warmed plates. Serve garnished with parsley.

YOUR NUTRITION – Summer Pasta Salad

Foodbank_TLCRecipe_Graphic_Blog

Here is a summer recipe from our Teens Love Cooking classes, which we offer in Santa Barbara, Santa Maria and Carpinteria. Try cooking this recipe at home!

Picking up the basil and tomatoes from your local farmers market will make this recipe taste that much fresher! It’s the perfect dish for sharing at picnics or potlucks.

SERVES 4

  • Ingredients:
    • 8 ounces dry whole-wheat rotini or other shaped pasta
    • 2 large tomatoes, chopped
    • 1⁄2 red onion, thinly sliced
    • 3 green onions, thinly sliced
    • 1⁄2 cup chopped fresh basil
    • 1 15-ounce can white beans, drained and rinsed
    • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
    • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
    • kosher or sea salt, to taste
    • freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Directions:

  1. Cook pasta according to package directions.
  2. Drain and rinse.
  3. Combine pasta with remaining ingredients and let stand for 30 minutes at room temperature prior to serving.

 

 

Meet Stephanie Sokolove

Preface: This interview took place last year. She is graciously hosting this year’s Table of Life Event at her Estate. What a wonderful partner she has been to the Foodbank!

Onto the Interview: September 2014

The-BEET Stephanie Sokolove

Many of you have heard of the Table of Life Fundraiser that supports the Foodbank’s Feed the Future programs, a sequential series of programs created by the Foodbank of Santa Barbara County that fosters nutritional health and independence in children of all ages. This year, on October 5th, the Foodbank is thrilled and proud to have Stephanie Sokolove as Table of Life’s keynote speaker. Stephanie is Owner and Executive Chef to THREE nationally recognized restaurants in the Boston area, Stephanie’s on Newbury, Stephi’s on Tremont, and Stephi’s in Southie.

Stephanie has built her business on a style of cooking that she calls “Sophisticated Comfort,” a style that is fresh, interesting, and yet familiar. “Sophisticated Comfort Food” is the next generation of comfort food in that it blends traditional favorites with today’s food preferences. Dishes are imaginatively created with current, fresher ingredients and bolder flavors then artistically presented. At the restaurant, Stephanie spins familiar classics into elegant dishes that comfort and surprise without being fussy or intimidating.

http://www.stephaniesonnewbury.com/stephanie-sokolove-bio.pdf

I sat down with the gracious Stephanie Sokolove to ask her some questions about her health and food philosophies, and of course I couldn’t help but ask a little about her restaurants.

The BEET Question 1To me healthy is waking up and feeling good; feeling energetic, clear headed and ready to face the day.

The BEET Question 2

It’s important to be able to function at your top level.  If were not healthy it’s hard to get through the day.  For example, I play golf.  To feel and play my best, I don’t eat big meals beforehand, as I need to feel light to play well.

The BEET Question 3

It’s got to play into it. But I believe survival probably comes first before health. If people knew where healthy choices were offered, I think they would make the right choice. But people don’t always know where to get healthy foods.   If we can get this message out to the community, I think that would be amazingly welcomed. What kills me is to see overweight kids, eating unhealthy foods, they can’t feel well!

The BEET Question 4

Personal health choices and restaurant services can be conflicting, as, what makes food delicious is not necessarily what you should eat every day.  However in my restaurants, everything is fresh, nothing comes out of a can; fresh is best.  That is a requirement to make food delicious.  Sugar, butter, and salt tend to make food taste better but we have cut back on these things for our health.   So we also offer dishes with less butter, less cream, and use fresh sauces instead of cream sauces for fish. California food has seen an evolution over the last 20 years.  It was known for its heavy comfort foods, but now we are seeing lighter comfort foods and fresher options like all kinds of amazing salads.

The BEET Question 6 I believe the Avocado is the healthiest single food we could eat.  And it is so versatile!  Substitute for oil and butter.  It’s a Fruit/ vegetable that is worth experimenting with;  Salads, sauces, baking.  Salads don’t need oil, ripe avocado gives salad a lovely creamy texture.

The BEET Question 8 Working in a restaurant where food is abundant, you become unaware of how much food is needed.  Working with the Foodbank has been an eye-opener to me.