Monthly Archives: August 2018

Pears

Pears are tasty fall fruit in Santa Barbara County, but did you know they are also a great source of fiber, vitamins, and minerals? They are packed with  vitamins C and K, potassium, calcium, iron, magnesium, and folate. Pears also contain phytonutrients that protect against certain diseases and cancers.

For a quick, tasty treat, enjoy pears sliced on a cracker with honey and some cheese. This also makes a great appetizer at your next get-together!

Apple, Pear, Cranberry Cobbler

2 pounds ripe Bosc pears (4 pears)

2 pounds firm Macoun apples (6 apples)

3/4 cup dried cranberries

1 teaspoon grated orange zest

1 teaspoon grated lemon zest

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1/4 cup all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

For the topping:

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

3/4 cup granulated sugar

3/4 cup light brown sugar, lightly packed

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 cup old-fashioned oatmeal

1/2 C of coconut oil

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Peel and core the pears and apples and cut them into large chunks. Place the fruit in a large bowl and toss with the cranberries, zests, juices, granulated sugar, flour, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Pour into a 9 by 12 by 2-inch baking dish.

For the topping:

Combine the flour, sugars, salt, oatmeal, and coconut oil/margarine in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Mix on low speed for 1 to 2 minutes, or until the mixture is in large crumbles. Sprinkle evenly over the fruit, covering the fruit completely.

Place the baking dish on a parchment-lined sheet pan and bake for 50 minutes to 1 hour, until the top is brown and the fruit is bubbly. Serve warm.

 

Written by Taylor Brower.

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The blog is back in town! Meet Taylor Brower, our newest blog contributor.

Taylor is an alumni of UC Santa Barbara where she received her Bachelor’s of Science in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. She is currently studying at University of Alabama to receive a second Bachelor’s degree in Nutrition to work toward becoming a Registered Dietitian. Taylor discovered her passion for nutrition during her senior year at UCSB when she realized that food is medicine and that, when paired with a healthy lifestyle, it can prevent and reverse many common diseases that plague our country today. She is passionate about educating others on the benefits of incorporating more fruits and vegetables into their diet and loves talking about health. When she is not studying or working with the Foodbank, Taylor works at Santa Barbara Family Chiropractic and teaches swim lessons at Cathedral Oaks Athletic Club. She is an avid cyclist and can usually be found riding in the mountains during the weekends.

 

Apples are always a popular autumn fruit. They will be in season soon in Santa Barbara, which means it’s time for you to get the real #nutritionfacts. Check out this week’s post for the truth about apples and last week’s post for a delicious, innovative recipe!

“An apple a day keeps the doctor away” might be an overused phrase, but it’s actually true! Increased consumption of apples daily is associated with a decrease in risk for certain cancers such as breast, ovarian, and colorectal(1). This protection is due to the abundance of antioxidants apples contain, most of which are actually concentrated in the peel (so make sure to eat that too!). Apples are also a great source of fiber to help regulate blood sugar and make for a great snack!

  1. Gallus S, Talamini R, Giacosa A et al. Does an apple a day keep the oncologist away? J Agric Food Chem 2003; 51(3): 609-14

Contributed by Taylor Brower

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Apple Pie Overnight Oats

 

As a student-athlete who is working 40+ hours a week, it is important to me to have quick go-to meals that I can grab and have on the go, will give me enough sustained energy that will last me throughout the day and will help me recover from my workouts. Oatmeal has been one of my favorite breakfasts lately, but cooking it on the stove takes some time and so I have turned to loaded overnight oats instead of instant oatmeal packets for a time-efficient breakfast in the mornings. These oats are loaded with crisp apples that stay crunchy, and warming fall spices like cinnamon or pumpkin spice that not only add flavor but spices are packed full of antioxidants that help with exercise recovery and reduce blood pressure and blood sugar level. The pumpkin seeds are full of iron, zinc and antioxidants.

1 cup steel cut oats

1 cup plant-based milk

1Tbsp brown sugar or maple syrup

1/2 Apple diced (I like honeycrips or fuji, but green apples would also work)

1 tsp cinnamon

1tsp Turmeric (you won’t be able to taste the Turmeric, but it has such great health benefits, I try to add it to everything)

Small Handful of pepitas or pumpkin seeds

Add all ingredients into a mason jar or tupperwear container and shake to mix well. Place in fridge overnight. Add peanut butter or some other nut butter on top if desired. Grab and go in the morning and enjoy at school/work/ after the gym/ before the gym/ really anytime.

Healthy Eating: It Really is Quality Over Quantity

Many diets today focus on cutting out a specific nutrient like carbohydrates, fat, or gluten (just to name a few). This over-generalized advice puts certain foods into a category and suddenly people start avoiding very nutrient-dense, healthy foods because they have been put in the same category as an unhealthy food.

Take fruit for example. Fruit is one of the healthiest things you can eat. In the Global Burden of Disease Study (a comprehensive research program assessing mortality from different diseases and risk factors), they found that one of the main risk factors for mortality was not consuming enough fruit. Fruit is packed full of vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidants, and phytonutrients, yet we have placed fruit in the same category as a cupcake or a glass of soda because of its fructose (sugar) content. This causes confusion for the general public and people just end up eating the way they always have and avoid consuming some of the healthiest foods on earth.

Instead of becoming so reductive about our food choices, we should begin to look at food as a whole instead of its parts. Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes are all very nutrient dense and healthy. When a diet is centered around these foods, which are as close to nature as possible, we don’t need to worry about avoiding particular categories of food for one less-than-perfect trait.

So, for the next few weeks, we will be talking about seasonal fruits, busting myths about them, and trying out new recipes. Check back weekly for the latest updates! For comments, questions, and more info, check us out at @foodbanksbc on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Contributed by Taylor Brower

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